Conference Workshops and Presenters

Social Artistry - Art for Change

(Workshops are listed in scheduled order by time slot.)

EB1 — Stretch, Breathe, Meditate and Draw

Presenter: Beryl Cohen
      SESSION FULL!      
Workshop description: Come wake up that body, expand, explore, energize and ground. Participants will be guided through a series of movements and postures that will connect you to your inner core. Earth Day Yoga brings our consciousness to the present moment, the breath, the here and now. Whether you wish to grow strong, release tension, or just turn off the mind’s chatter, this class will help you to stay present through awareness of breath and standing, seated, and balancing postures. Wear loose clothes, bring your mat, and a water bottle. Art materials will be on hand for self-expression and journaling after Savasana.
Audience: All
Duration: 1 hour
Max. participants: 20
Biography: Beryl Cohen is a founding teacher at Karen Kain School of the Arts (TDSB), an AQ Art Instructor at OISE/UT, and Co-President of OAEA. In 2016, she moved to a central position as a TDSB Learning Coach supporting schools in achievement, equity, and health and wellness. She presented The Map as Art at the 2016 CSEA conference, where she received the The Ronita deBlois Canadian Art Educator of the Year Elementary (K-8). She has worked on numerous Ministry curriculum writing projects, and in 2014 was selected as the winner of the W.A. Townshend Gold Medal in Education at the University of Western Ontario. Beryl is interested in the intersections between the arts and health and wellness. In 2014, she was granted her 200 hour Registered Yoga Teacher certificate from Octopus Garden yoga studio in Toronto.


A1 — Don’t Hate the Player! A Social Media Educational Storytelling Card Game

Presenter: Elizabeth Basskin
Workshop description: In this workshop delegates will participate in group discussions addressing positive and negative aspects of social media and how they use social media in their classrooms. They will play the storytelling card game “Don’t Hate the Player,” in small groups. Once finished, participants will document their story by taking a picture of their storyboard and writing a short synopsis of their game and posting on the game’s Instagram page. After participants can explore their stories and extend their personal learning by choosing one of three extension activities such as writing a short story, drawing a comic or creating a You Tube video. To conclude, they will provide feedback on the game and brainstorm how they might use it in their classrooms.
Audience: Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 30
Biography: Elizabeth Basskin is an artist and educator with a passion for media literacy, history and film. She has a Master of Digital Media degree from Ryerson University. Her final project involved a card game called “Don’t Hate the Player,” designed to raise teen awareness about the potential risks of social media and ideas about how to avoid them, and is now being incubated at Ryerson’s Transmedia Zone.


A2 — Chromatics: No Mix Colour Workshop

Presenter: Prof. Olivia Gude
      SESSION FULL!      
Workshop description: Implement “No Mix Colour” experimentation in your classroom and experience the pleasure of hearing a student say, “I need a pale dull yellow,” seeing other students search, then graciously offer colours that fit the description, and then hearing the student say, “Thank you, that’s just the colour I needed to make this work.” Ever feel demoralized because after years of colour wheels and colour harmony projects many students still don’t make thoughtful, nuanced colour choices? In this workshop, you’ll experience lots of fun, fast, inexpensive, and smart solutions to developing colour vocabulary and colour sensibilities. Even you, an experienced art teacher, will find that after this workshop your understanding of the pleasure and possibilities of colour in own work will be vividly enhanced.
Audience: Junior, Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 25
Biography: Prof. Olivia Gude is the Angela Gregory Paterakis Professor of Art Education at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Professor Gude served as a member of the Visual Arts writing team for the new National Visual Arts Standards and is a member of the Council for Policy Studies in Art Education. The National Art Education Association awarded her the Viktor Lowenfeld Award for significant contributions to the field of art education in 2009 and in 2014 she was the recipient of the NAEA’s Manuel Barkan “article of the year” award. She has created many award-winning collaborative mural and mosaic projects. In recent years, she has united her work as a community artist and art educator by creating participatory spaces in which teachers investigate and re-invent the social practice of art education. These include organizing a Manifesta of Art Education at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago in 2012 and gatherings of the Skeptical Assessment Society at Virginia Commonwealth University in 2013, for the Art Educators of Iowa in 2015, and for the Missouri Art Education Association in 2016.


A3 — Imagineering Stories through Collage and Mixed Media

Presenter: Quentin VerCetty
Workshop description: This workshop will encourage participants to look at social justice through a futuristic lens, to address a personal topic of interest using science fiction or anything that might involve a futuristic aesthetic. Participants will explore visual metaphors and fundamentals of semiotics in order to communicate a visual narrative, using a mixed media collage process. Unique examples of collage stories will be shared as participants are challenged to draw from the well of their knowledge, personal art backgrounds, and experiences.
Audience: Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 30
Biography: Quentin VerCetty is an award winning, art making, chess playing, community building, storyteller who knows no boundaries when it comes to his artistic expression. His work includes painting, illustration, installation, graphic designing, 3D printing and renderings, spoken word poetry, and West African drumming. He recently obtained his BFA from OCAD University. His current work is about artivism and using futuristic lenses and science fiction narratives to address social justice issues.


A4 — Engaging Street Art Practices to Mobilize Social Justice

Presenter: Robert Durocher
      LIMITED SPACES LEFT!      
Workshop description: In this practical workshop, delegates will begin by examining a variety of street art practices that challenge, provoke, and/or question viewers thoughts, ideas, biases and understandings of equity, power, and privilege. We will look at works based in bringing forms of oppression such as racism, colonization, homophobia, transphobia, ableism, sexism, etc. into conversations and dialogue in the visual arts classroom, and how to engage students in critically analyzing these works. Ideas for implementing these actions across the divisions and integrating with other subject areas will be presented. Delegates will also engage in street art activities such as stenciling, postering, interventions, socially engaged art, and mixed media performance that can be used in their classrooms. The opportunity to engage in street arts-based learning activities can mobilize social justice.
Audience: Junior, Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 30
Biography: Robert Durocher is currently a K-12 Learning Coach, with the TDSB. Previous to this he was site lead and course director for the Fine Arts Site (Faculty of Education, York U.) where he taught arts integration to teacher candidates. Robert’s curriculum and pedagogy is embedded in equity, social justice, and anti-oppression practices. In his own art practice he is currently working with drawing, collage, and photo apps. Robert loves flowers!


A5 — Decolonizing and Indigenizing Arts Education

Presenter: Tanya Senk
      SESSION FULL!      
Workshop description: “My people will sleep for one hundred years, but when they awake, it will be the artists who give them their spirit back” (Louis Riel, 1885). Participants will have an opportunity to learn from Indigenous artists and engage in a discussion about arts education through decolonizing and Indigenous epistemological approaches. Considering this perspective, Indigenous art can be seen as an act of resistance and self-determination. Ideas of Indigenous knowledge and art as a decolonizing strategy in education will be presented.
Audience: Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 25
Biography: Tanya Senk is Métis/Cree/Saulteaux educator/artist/scholar, who has been working in the field of education, community and the arts for over twenty five years. She has been an arts educator, a Course Director at York University, Faculty of Education, Community and Arts-Based Teacher Education Program, an Instructional Leader and Program Coordinator in Indigenous Education and has taught Indigenous Arts at York University. She is currently the Central Coordinating Vice Principal for Aboriginal Education, Toronto DSB. She holds a BFA in Visual Arts/Studio, a BEd, an interdisciplinary MA (Arts/Education) with a focus on Indigenous arts as pedagogy (Indigenous digital storytelling), as well as a Visual Arts Honours Specialist AQ. As a PhD candidate in Urban Indigenous Education (York), her research interests include Indigenous arts and knowledge(s) in institutions of public education, museums and galleries, decolonizing arts education, and Indigenous digital storytelling. The question that is central to her work is: What and how does Indigenous knowledge contribute to the process of reconciliation through the arts?


B1 — Creative Connections: Engaging Seniors and Students through Art

Presenter: Peg Dunnem
Workshop description: This workshop will highlight examples and strategies to support intergenerational programming—having seniors work alongside and collaborate with children and adolescents. Through a panel discussion, visual support materials, and a hands-on art making opportunity, participants will gain knowledge and inspiration about implementing intergenerational workshops in their school and community.
Audience: Primary, Junior, Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 25
Biography: Peg Dunnem is Curator of Education at Gallery Stratford. In her role, Peg plans innovative art education programs for the community and schools, sources new opportunities for diverse interactions with art, and advocates for accessibility in art education. For the last five years, Peg has established , organized, and led several intergenerational workshops for seniors and primary and secondary students. These successful workshops have garnered continuous funding from grant agencies, and have been nominated for program excellence, from OAAG (Ontario Association of Art Galleries).


B2 — Using Free Mobile Apps for Teaching, Presenting, and Creating

Presenter: Katherine Yamashita
      SESSION FULL!      
Workshop description: In the past, a lot of training was required to montage photos or draw on a computer, create websites, create animated infographic-type videos, and make logos and graphics. Now many of these can be done on a smartphone or tablet device. In this workshop participants will be introduced to a wide range of free applications for use on IOS and Android devices, and in some instances, on desktop browsers. They will also see how these apps can be used by teachers and their students in new and creative ways. Finally, they will get a chance to play with some of them and share what they have created. Having a smart device with room to install apps would be an asset, but not required for this workshop.
Audience: Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 20
Biography: Katherine Yamashita has been an educator for over 30 years. A co-founder of CyberARTs in the Toronto DSB and former Head of Film at Earl Haig Secondary School, Kathy is also an Adobe Educational Trainer. She is currently teaching at the undergraduate level in the Faculty of Education at UOIT.


B3 — Mapping Change: Social Justice Education in the Arts Classroom

Presenters: Myra Leibu & Meghan Park
Workshop description: Participants will be introduced to the basic tenants of equity, anti-oppression, and critical pedagogy. Using a variety of visual arts, drama, and dance strategies, we will explore issues of identity and power by using pop culture texts and artifacts as a jumping off points. Teachers can use pop culture not just as a way to engage students and make learning relevant but as a means to unpack complex socio-political and ideological concepts. Through an interdisciplinary and inquiry-based approach, we will re-read pop culture artifacts as texts that permit an exploration of social justice themes, foster increased access and success for students with diverse learning styles, and encourage the development of cultural and critical literacies through the arts. The workshop will focus on using the Creative Process to create dialogue around social justice issues, and moving students from being consumers to becoming cultural producers and change-makers.
Audience: Primary, Junior, Intermediate
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 30
Biography: Myra Leibu completed a BFA in Visual Arts and graduate studies at OISE/UT. She has dedicated her energy in and out of traditional school settings towards change-making inspired by young people’s resilience and creativity. Myra has worked as an artist, educator, and non-profit administrator in the community-engaged arts sector and taught art in the elementary panel in public schools in New York City, Montreal, and York Region. Meghan Park is a graduate of the Drama in Education program, University of Windsor, and holds a graduate degree from OISE/UT. Meghan has taught at Young People’s Theatre, The Drama Workshop, The Linden School, and is an Ontario Arts Council Artist in Education grant recipient. Meghan has presented arts workshops for students and teachers with ETFO, ETT and CODE. She has taught drama and dance in the TDSB since 2007.


B4 — Social Advocacy: Does Contemporary (largely Canadian) Painting Help?

Presenter: John Armstrong
Workshop description: We will look at some historical and contemporary artists interested in engaging issues such as the environment, sustainability, politics, economies, and cultural representation—through painting.
Audience: Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 25
Biography: John Armstrong is an artist and writer who teaches painting in the studio division of Art and Art History, a collaborative Honours BA program between Sheridan College in Oakville, Ontario and the University of Toronto Mississauga. Over the past ten years, he has collaborated with Paris artist Paul Collins; their work has been on view in a number of solo and group exhibitions in Canada and Europe. Visit his website for more information: www.johnarmstrong.ca.


B5 — Exploring French Culture and Heritage through Art

Presenter: Stephanie Corriveau
Workshop description: Explore the history of French speaking communities through the visual record created by Quebecois, Métis and European artists and their contributions to la francophone and the world. This workshop is based on the French Culture and Heritage Through Art program offered at the AGO. Teachers will explore artworks and participate in activities that can be taken back to the classroom and used with their students, including creative writing (poetry, automatic writing, short stories). Workshop participants will engage with artworks through the Critical Analysis Process through themes of Canadian identity and social justice, and will focus on their communication skills in French to describe and interpret visual artworks, with students.
Audience: Junior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 25
Biography: Stephanie Corriveau has been an Education Officer, Children and Youth at the Art Gallery of Ontario, since 2011. She recently published a fiction novel titled La Grande Illusion (2016). She holds a Masters degree in Museum Studies and a Bachelors degree in Art History.


B6 — Inside Out: Connecting Identities to Social Justice

Presenter: Jennifer Chin & Monica Gutierrez
      LIMITED SPACES LEFT!      
Workshop description: In this workshop, delegates will engage creatively and critically to create a collective portrait of current social justice concerns by exploring how their personal identity(ies) can lead to critical understandings about those selected social justice issues. Delegates will explore these concepts through photography, drawings/poster design, and an on-site, collaborative, innovative video artwork.
Audience: Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 20
Biography: Jennifer Chin is a visual artist and educator working in Toronto, Ontario. She holds a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Windsor and an Associate’s Diploma from the Ontario College of Art and Design. She has exhibited her multi-disciplinary works across Canada and the United States, and has lead numerous youth focused, community arts programs with a variety of organizations including: VIBE Arts for Children and Youth of Toronto and The Royal Ontario Museum; The Art Gallery of Algoma; The City of Toronto’s Cultural Services Department and Canon Canada. She currently teaches photography to adults and youth at the Avenue Road Arts School in Toronto. Monica Gutierrez is coordinating the Arts for Social Justice project at VIBE Arts. She has facilitated digital media, and digital storytelling workshops in Canada and Central America, and directs and produces social justice and environmental documentary films with 3004 Studios in Toronto.


C1 — Finding Home: Personal Journeys and Visual Narratives

Presenters: Vanessa Barnett & Elena Soni
      SESSION FULL!      
Workshop description: Participants will build a visual narrative of their concept of “home,” and experience how meaningful change can take place in classroom communities when students realize that art is a vehicle to express ideas and affect social change. This session will emphasize that working on long term projects can facilitate the building of trust between educators and student-artists, thereby creating a sense of safety to explore difficult, authentic subject matter in greater depth.
Audience: Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 3 hours
Max. participants: 20
Biography: Vanessa Barnett recently retired from the Toronto DSB where she worked as a Visual Arts and Media Arts Instructional Leader K-12 and Acting Arts Program Coordinator, developing curriculum, supporting teachers, and creating district-wide projects across the city. Vanessa is a faculty member at both Ryerson and York Universities. Elena Soni teaches visual arts to junior grades at The Mabin School. She is a creator and facilitator of independent projects for social justice and change. Elena and Vanessa are partners in Art for Social Change, a consulting firm that designs and facilitates art based projects in partnership with museums and other cultural institutions.


C2 — Expanding Stop-Motion Animation

Presenter: Julie Etheridge
Workshop description: During this hands-on workshop, participants will revisit and discuss current trends in animation. Participants will learn about stop-motion animation, various techniques, as well as new apps that can be used in classrooms. Various projects and themes will be explored to demonstrate how animation can be used as an artistic medium to generate authentic and personal art making. Participants will be invited to work in teams to create their own 1 minute animation. For this workshop, participants will require a cellphone and the ability to download a free app.
Audience: Intermediate
Duration: 3 hours
Max. participants: 24
Biography: Julie Etheridge has been a visual arts specialist with the English Montreal School Board for the past 16 years. Her classroom practice focuses on process orientated art making and the use of technology. Etheridge has presented at both national and international conferences. She is currently pursuing a doctoral degree in art education at Concordia.


C3 — collaborate • appropriate • renovate • donate

Presenter: Karin Silverstone
Workshop description: In this workshop, participants will discuss the challenges of bringing student art into the community via silent auctions. We will explore venues and themes as well as look at the motivational factors that must accompany students when working collaboratively and with a target audience that is community-based. Participants will get to experience the creative process of renovating a wooden object—shelf, box, etcetera—with a partner, as inspired by his/her knowledge of art history and techniques. Templates for assessment and checklists for success will be shared as the participants devise plans for a silent auction. Participants will be encouraged to bring along with them their favourite tools: small paint brushes, permanent markers, stamps or stencils to further enhance personal style, as only acrylics and standard brushes will be available. Dress for mess.
Audience: Senior
Duration: 3 hours
Max. participants: 20
Biography: Karin Silverstone is a graduate of the University of Guelph (specialized fine arts & French) and has her BEd (Toronto). She taught l’art visuel at Lawrence Park Collegiate (Toronto DSB), from 1995-1998; then communications technology, English, and visual art at Elmira District SS (Waterloo Region DSB), from 1999-2002; and since then has been teaching l’art visuel and drawing/painting. She has her Honours Specialist, and has participated in AP studio art education at Columbia College, with Barbara Sunday. She works part-time as she is a practising artist (www.karinsilverstone.com) and a mom!


D1 — Teacherpreneurship & The Bootstrapping Checklist

Presenter: Richard Baxter
Workshop description: Teacherpreneurs have a critical role to play as social justice advocates to try to alleviate a projected world-wide teacher shortage of 25 million, by 2030. Where do you fit in the global EdTech ecosystem and what is your moral purpose as we respond to this global crisis? Rich Baxter will present The Bootstrapping Checklist, a Grade 8 classroom program that was shortlisted for the 2016 Wharton QS Stars Reimagine Education Awards (http://www.reimagine-education.com/conference/) and presented in Philadelphia, along with 140 other internationally recognized global-scaled projects, in order to demonstrate how practitioners might successfully make use of the global EdTech ecosystem. The Bootstrapping Checklist exists in the Creative Commons as an open innovation project.
Audience: Junior, Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 25
Biography: Richard Baxter is an educator and advocate for social and open innovation, the arts, and entrepreneurial education in our classrooms. He teaches Grade 8 Math, Language and Social Studies for the TDSB.


D2 — Social Justice in Documentary Photography: Analyze and Create!

Presenter: Denise Roberts
      SESSION FULL!      
Workshop description: Participants will explore historic social justice photographs from Ryerson University’s Blackstar Collection. Each participant will be given their own photograph to work on using the Critical Analysis Process. Then we will explore the cultural context of the historic photograph to write a then/now digital museum label for the work. This will involve blitz research, instructions on how to write a label, and how to connect thoughts and ideas in under 125 words. Each person will respond creatively by making a sketch or plan for a complimentary work of their own using photographs, poetry, sound recording, collage, and more!
Audience: Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 15
Biography: Denise Roberts is a museum educator, interpretive planner, and project manager with a MEd (Western) specializing in arts and museum education. Denise also holds a BAA in photography (Ryerson) and a BA in art history (McMaster). With over five years of experience at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Public Programming and Interpretive Planning, and 10+ years of experience working in learning design, Denise has developed audio, video, online, and live programs for adult audiences, schools, teachers, and youth. https://deniseroberts.squarespace.com


D3 — Traces of Existence

Presenter: Margot Roi
      SESSION FULL!      
Workshop description: Participants in this workshop will explore personal artistic growth alongside practical curriculum opportunities. Focusing on the concept of voice, we will connect a personal, theme-based narrative to the United Nations Global Goals for Sustainable Living. Through the inquiry process we examine social activist artists Jane Ash Poitras, Swoon, and Kim Laurel to further the conversation. Collaboratively, the Creative Process is explored with experimental, mixed media printmaking methods that will produce an art for change awareness statement.
Audience: Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 15
Biography: Margot Roi is a visual arts educator, who as a past-president of the Ontario Art Education Association, has co-authored and coordinated many Ministry of Education, school board, OCT, CODE, and OAEA educational publications. She is a learning instructor for the visual arts AQ program at OISE, UofT, and co-creator and instructor of an I/S visual arts two-year program at the Faculty of Education, Brock University. In her role as a Hamilton Wentworth DSB professional development facilitator, she engaged educators with innovative approaches, receiving several HWDSB Profiling Excellence Awards. She is also the recipient of the OAEA Ray Blackwell Award and the CSEA Provincial Affiliates Award.


D4 — Appealing to Diverse Learners through Non-traditional Learning

Presenters: Maureen Da Silva, Quentin Lindsay & Joey Suriano
Workshop description: The AGO is an environment that serves as an ideal space of expanded learning experiences for students from diverse backgrounds, and a multiplicity of abilities and interests, in grades K-12. During this workshop, three gallery educators will share experiences and insights gleaned from working with a variety of students. We will launch a discussion around the question: What constitutes a successful experience in non-traditional learning about visual art, for students with diverse learning needs? In collaboration with workshop participants, we will create a “toolkit” of strategies that respond to different styles and levels of learning, and strategies that promote learning for a diverse range of student needs.
Audience: Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 25
Biography: Quentin Lindsay, Joey Suriano & Maureen Da Silva currently work at the Art Gallery of Ontario as Education Officers, Child and Youth. Lindsay and Da Silva both work as professional artists, and engage in a variety of community art initiatives and workshops across Toronto and the GTA. Da Silva is a co-founder of the non-profit artist group the inPrint Collective, and sits on the committee for the Feminist Art Conference in Toronto. Lindsay is the executive director of the Black Speculative Arts Movement: Canada (BSAMCanada) and operates a chess & design fused mentorship organization for at risk youth called PRIYOME. Suriano is on the Board of Directors for Camp Ten Oaks and Acorn Project, and also works as an instructor at the Neilson Park Creative Centre.


D5 — Advanced Projects and Landmarks 2017: Selected Practices

Presenter: Jay Wilson
Workshop description: This workshop will present student-directed projects that engage the natural vs. urban environment, algae blooms and how they impact the water table, and the plight of migratory birds and urban environment. Projects are in performance, painting, photography, and sculpture. As well, delegates will experience highlights of the special sesquicentennial, cross-Canada initiative, Landmarks 2017 course curriculum.
Audience: Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 25
Biography: Jay Wilson is a sculptor, designer, curator, and educator who teaches design and oversees the Advanced Projects in Art and Art History, a joint program between the University of Toronto at Mississauga and Sheridan College. Wilson sat on the Boards of both Mercer Union and Oakville Galleries and has been an Ontario Arts Council Established Artist jury member. Wilson was the inaugural winner of the Toronto Friends of the Visual Arts award and currently is co-curating a group show, entitled “The Closer Together Things Are” with curator Shannon Anderson, that will travel to four venues across Canada. Further details are available at jaywilsonart.com.


D6 — Deconstructing an Art Education Professional Learning Community

Presenters: Carrie Swartz & Dr. Peter Vietgen
Workshop description: Exploring the concept of a professional learning community as a form of professional development, this presentation will share the various components that made up a four-day seminar for educators wishing to learn more about the field of art education practice in relation to museum/gallery education. Discussion will involve such topics as the use of contemporary art as a launching point for engaging in dialogue around the role that art can play in experiential learning, as well as understanding self-reflection and the practice of looking inwards to who we are as educators, while engaging in visual arts teaching.
Audience: Primary, Junior, Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 30
Biography: Carrie Swartz is Assistant Manager, School and Teacher Programs, at the Art Gallery of Ontario. Carrie came to the AGO after working at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum. Dr. Peter Vietgen is Associate Professor of Art Education, Faculty of Education, Brock University. A former Visual Arts Consultant with the Toronto DSB, Peter is currently President of the Canadian Society for Education through Art.


E1 — Fostering Empathy through Art: Pandora’s Box

Presenter: Lea Kabiljo
Workshop description: In this workshop we will examine the role empathy plays in our teaching practice. By engaging in a participatory art activity, we will explore ways in which we can increase our sense of empathy as educators and how we can foster and promote the development of empathy amongst our students.
Audience: Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 20
Biography: Lea Kabiljo is a researcher, educator and community activist. Currently she is pursuing a PhD degree at Concordia University, where she is also working as part-time faculty in art education. She was a high school art teacher for a number of years, as well as the executive director of LOVE- Leave Out Violence, a leading non-profit organization in violence prevention programs.


E2 — Slow Design Movement through Screen Printing

Presenter: Holly Boileau
      SESSION FULL!      
Workshop description: The relationship Western society has with material things is wasteful and detached. Most textile products are made in large scale production, with little creativity or consideration for quality and meaning. As an alternative, the “Slow Design Movement” allows the craft artist to relish in the process, time, thought, energy, and heart that goes into the making. Materials artist and designer Holly Boileau uses screen printing to illustrate the slow design movement. When the creative process is given the time it deserves and each step is thoughtfully planned out, the artwork garners respect and intention. This process embeds the meaning in the object that is missing from so many material things our society throws away. Participants of this workshop will learn about the ecologically unsound nature of the textile industry, and get to experience the steps involved in designing and crafting a meaningful artwork.
Audience: Junior, Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 25
Biography: Holly Boileau received her BA in Design from OCAD University, specializing in fibre arts and material exploration. Together with her business partner, she started Woodwater, a design company that makes clothing and homewares. In 2012 she was awarded an artist residency in the Textile Studio at Harbourfront Centre where she continues to develop her personal practice in art and material construction. Through thoughtful design and crafting of objects, she examines meanings that arise from material, pattern, form and purpose. Boileau hopes her objects elicit a sense of familiarity; that they will evoke intimate and profound moments.


E3 — From the AGO to Your Classroom: Using the Critical Analysis Process to Mine Historical & Contemporary Art for Social Justice Themes

Presenters: Laboni Islam & Lauren Spring
Workshop description: Participants will explore ways to incorporate art into their social justice classroom learning. We will practice using the Critical Analysis Process to respond to, describe, analyze, and evaluate historical and contemporary art in relation to its cultural context. We will use the art as a vehicle to unpack economic, political, social, and environmental problems within society—past and present, local and global.
Audience: Junior, Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 30
Biography: Laboni Islam is a poet and former Peel DSB elementary-school teacher. Lauren Spring is a theatre artist and PhD candidate in Education and Community Development at OISE. Both Islam and Spring currently work at the Art Gallery of Ontario, as education officers and art instructors for visiting K-12 students.


E4 — Teaching Social Justice through Visual Arts/Mixed Media Inquiry

Presenter: Bethany Armstrong
      WORKSHOP CANCELLED.      
Workshop description: In this workshop, participants will learn how to integrate inquiry-based projects with visual arts curriculum and other subject areas. The session will explore the creation of unique and personal inquiry units and lessons, strategies for using the Critical Analysis Process to interrogate a social justice artwork, and how to guide students in applying the Creative Process to produce inventive artwork. Grades 6 and 8 exemplars will illustrate different ways of modifying the same inquiry for multiple grades.
Audience: Junior, Intermediate
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 30
Biography: Bethany Armstrong works as a visual arts and special education teacher, in the Peel DSB. Prior to that she worked as both a language arts and social studies teacher in both elementary and secondary panels, across multiple grades. Bethany currently teaches the Visual Arts Part 2 Additional Qualification course through ETFO. She completed her BEd at Nipissing University and a MEd at OISE/UT.


E5 — Learning From Within: Place-based Making for Meaning

Presenter: Trish Osler
Workshop description: This workshop invites educators to experience the powerfully transformative potential of an arts initiative as applied to community-based art partnerships. Considering and decoding transdisciplinary approaches to learning through an ongoing project in a neighbourhood which has experienced hardship through urban change, delegates will understand the opportunities and challenges presented through this learning model. This proposal outlines a collaborative, place-based artistic response to the built environment, partnering with local organizations and non-profit gathering spaces such as food banks, libraries, and community services. In turn, delegates will develop their own project/unit plan that considers local partnership opportunities and the needs of their learners. Founded on the principles of social economy, education as a right, food justice, and community self-determination, delegates will come away with strategies for learning from and with their students, within communities of need.
Audience: Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 20
Biography: Trish Osler has taught for 15 years in leading independent schools and studios, designing and implementing approaches to creative thinking and learning. Currently a PhD candidate in art education, her area of interest is in building collaboration, experimentation and innovation, heightening the creative potential of individuals and organizations. Her work supports all learners, deepening their understanding and awareness of arts-based approaches to critical thinking. Recent place-based work draws on aspects of her identity as a/r/tographer.


E6 — Flipping the Script – Street Art for Social Change

Presenter: Suzanne Lagacey
      LIMITED SPACES LEFT!      
Workshop description: Can public art be used to send positive messages inspiring change? Graffiti and street art are controversial subjects in our society. This workshop will examine the analysis of historic and modern street artists such as Keith Haring, Banksy, Peter Gibson, and environmental and eco-artists such as Andy Goldsworthy, Anna Garforth, Jesse Graves and Alexandre Orion. As a result of critical thinking, students can feel invited and empowered to find their voice, discover their opinion, and communicate social justice meanings through their own art. This workshop will showcase examples of student work, highlighting a variety of indoor and outdoor art forms and styles, and artworks that communicate personal perspectives about social justice or environmental issues. Resources for a unit on street art and social change will be shared with participants who wish to explore these ideas in their own teaching.
Audience: Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 1.5 hours
Max. participants: 20
Biography: Suzanne Lagacey is a visual arts teacher at The Sterling Hall School. Suzanne has presented at various conferences including the International Boys School Coalition Conference in Melbourne, Australia, the National Art Education Association Conference in San Diego, California (Discovering DaVinci), and the Canadian Independent Schools Art Education Conference, on the topic of creative learning. Her passions include arts education, leadership through the arts and arts for social change.


F1 — Punished: Comix & Zines

Presenter: Prof. Olivia Gude
      SESSION FULL!      
Workshop description: Explore a subject that shapes people’s lives from childhood, but is rarely discussed on a philosophical level with youth—punishment. Learn techniques to stimulate students in the recollections, research, and analysis needed to make complex artworks. Empower students to shape compelling narratives based on personal stories of punishing and being punished. Create stylish autobiographical comix that don’t depend on the ability to draw realistically. Consider the big question: Is punishment necessary? The goal of this workshop is to foster thoughtful people who identify, examine and share life experiences and who develop internalized self-control, rooted in care for self and others.
Audience: Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 3 hours
Max. participants: 20
Biography: Prof. Olivia Gude is the Angela Gregory Paterakis Professor of Art Education at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Professor Gude served as a member of the Visual Arts writing team for the new National Visual Arts Standards and is a member of the Council for Policy Studies in Art Education. The National Art Education Association awarded her the Viktor Lowenfeld Award for significant contributions to the field of art education in 2009 and in 2014 she was the recipient of the NAEA’s Manuel Barkan “article of the year” award. She has created many award-winning collaborative mural and mosaic projects. In recent years, she has united her work as a community artist and art educator by creating participatory spaces in which teachers investigate and re-invent the social practice of art education. These include organizing a Manifesta of Art Education at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago in 2012 and gatherings of the Skeptical Assessment Society at Virginia Commonwealth University in 2013, for the Art Educators of Iowa in 2015, and for the Missouri Art Education Association in 2016.


F2 — Words To Live By

Presenter: David Nelson
Workshop description: In this workshop, participants will learn essentials of graphic design applied to typography, using Adobe Illustrator. Activities will include a “light” discussion about typographic history, and some of its technical aspects; an exercise to develop a quasi-synaesthetic sensitivity to the relationship between graphic and aural expression; a demonstration of thumbnailing in the design of typographic expression; and a culminating activity where participants will create their own graphically-expressive type treatment of a chosen phrase.
Audience: Intermediate, Senior
Duration: 3 hours
Max. participants: 25
Biography: David Nelson went to art school, learned to draw and paint, and then spent ten years working in advertising and communications prior to finding his true calling and becoming a teacher in 2002. He loves art and culture, and travels whenever and wherever he can to experience both.


F3 — Face to Face: Artistic Reflections on Child Labour

Presenters: Corrinne Chong & Renée Matta
Workshop description: Social injustices abound in the world but these often appear far removed from the insulated sphere of our students, who enjoy rights and fundamental personal freedoms. However, children are naturally curious about other children, an instinct that facilitates mutual identification and fosters empathy. Accordingly, an issue like the exploitation of child labourers has immediate impact. This workshop will include informative discussion, a PowerPoint presentation, and pedagogical resources pertaining to the systemic problem of child labour. The practical component is a theme-based, mixed media assemblage that focuses on critical thinking and self-reflection, with connections to the Creative Process.
Audience: Intermediate
Duration: 3 hours
Max. participants: 15
Biography: Renée Matta holds an Honours BEd specializing in FSL and History (UWO). She is currently the French Immersion chair at Bristol Road Middle School, having taught French as a Second Language since 2012. Her objective is to apply her leadership skills as an instructional coach or as a curriculum writer. She is also a trained RYT with Power Yoga Canada. Aside from yoga, she is passionate about social justice, art, and self-advocacy. Corrinne Chong was recently awarded her PhD in art history from the University of Edinburgh. She earned her BEd from OISE, specializing in J/I visual arts. Her academic research focuses on the convergences between music, painting, and literary criticism. She has presented at various international conferences and was a former instructor at the Mississauga Living Arts Centre. She is a passionate proponent of cross-curricular pedagogy and practice. Corrine currently teaches the arts at Bristol Road Middle School, in Mississauga.